Living Waste-Free

The concept of living entirely waste-free would take a bit of getting used to as our modern lifestyles constantly demand that our attention is focused on consuming for the sake of it.

Functionality or Fashion?

Our generation has not really had to think very much about trying to make things last long. As a result, we generally tend to favour fashion over functionality, which was certainly not the case a generation or two ago. Generally speaking, with the exception of the current economic downturn, we have not been in a position where we have to depend on rationing our spending for survival as our forebears have been. Long gone are the days where we make our own cooking stock from leftovers, or spend afternoons making jam and pickles so that our fruit can last long into the low season.

The fact of the matter is that we no longer have to think about these things because mass production and globalising markets mean that so much is done for us. 'Keeping up with the Joneses' has become a reality for many of us living in urban environments where we are constantly bombarded with advertising to buy products and services that we rarely actually need. How many of us feel the pressure to update our Smartphone as the latest models come out? How many of us buy prepackaged, pre-cut and sorted veges rather than spending time preparing a meal together?

The seemingly endless cycle of consumerism has led to us forgetting many of the important things in life. We generally work very hard, and spend less than an ideal amount of time with family and friends, sacrificing doing the things we love.

Wasteful living is not only harmful for our beautiful environment, but it is harmful for our own personal well-being and livelihood.

Where has our time gone?

The beauty about trying to live waste-free is that it reminds us about what's important in life. We all know what that is; and it largely comes down to doing the things we love, together with the people we love.

Our modern lifestyles force us into an endless cycle of living to work, but many of us are forgetting that we should be working to live. The "live" part of that equation is what is important!

The fact that so much of what we purchase at the supermarket comes prepackaged and factory prepared just reinforces our wide belief of the lack of time available to us. But a little reassessment quickly shows that if we spend a little bit of time and effort in thinking about our purchases as being founded on waste-free principles, we would actually save a lot of money, as well as time, ultimately leading to us spending more quality time doing things we love with those we love.

Move beyond the 3 “R’s” towards thinking about the 6 “R’s”

You're already used to the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle concept, but here are an additional 3 R's added to the mix that will help you to live waste free:

  1. Refuse what you don’t need
  2. Reduce what you do need
  3. Reuse anything that you can
  4. Recycle what you cannot refuse, reduce, or reuse
  5. Rehome what you no longer need or want
  6. Rot (i.e. compost) the rest

Top 10 tips for starting a waste-free lifestyle:

Living without waste doesn’t mean you have to live without life’s luxuries, it just means a more conscious approach to your consumer choices. You’ll be doing yourself a favour by saving on money on unnecessary purchases and ultimately reducing your own ecological footprint, and you’ll be doing the planet a favour by reducing the amount of waste going to landfill.

Here are some tips to get you started, or at least thinking about, moving towards a waste-free existence:

  1. Prioritise yours purchases: make sure they can all be reduced, reused, recycled, or rotted. This means that you will be responsible for sending a lot less waste to landfill. (Think the 6 R’s!)
  2. Tell people: let your friends and family know that this is something you are aiming to do so that they don’t give you anything that would end up in the landfill.
  3. Separate your waste: Keep food and kitchen scraps, garden waste, and recyclables separate
  4. Recycle everything you can: all unbroken glass, some plastics, paper and cardboard, tin and aluminium cans (check out our Identifying Recyclable Resources Page for more info.
  5. Avoid buying packaged and unrecyclable goods: rather, buy cereals, pastas, and other re-fillables in bulk when at the supermarket or at your local wholefoods store. Milk and juice cartons (although made from a combination of cardboard, plastic, and aluminium) are actually unrecyclable because of the complexities associated with their deconstruction.
  6. Say “No!” to that horrid plastic bag: Use canvas and other resusable bags when going shopping and
  7. Take glass or recyclable containers with you when grocery shopping: use these for goods that would otherwise be wrapped (such as meat, fish, and vege). Remember, even though Gladwrap and polystyrene are recyclable, the fact that they have been contaminated with food means that they often end up in the landfill even if you put them out for recycling.
  8. Give away what you no longer need: charity shops (such as the Hospice Shop, the Salvation Army and the like) will sell your old belongings in order to raise funds for their efforts. Another brilliant kiwi initiative is AskShareGive, an exchange site where you can donate unwanted items to fellow kiwis, or trade in your time, skills, or transport for those who need it. If you need anything yourself, you can ask for it on this site also.
  9. Sell what you do not want to give away: If you don’t want to give certain things away for free, remember you can always sell them. Trademe is a hub for New Zealanders who are buying and selling second-hand goods. There are heaps of places where you can potentially sell old items.
  10. Shop local: Supermarket chains are invariably owned by big businesses – often on overseas shores – which carry enormous carbon footprints because of the logistics associated with transportation and refrigeration. Visiting your local butcher, greengrocer, and farmers market will help stimulate our local economy and keep the dollar on our shores. Plus, you’d reduce your personal footprint in the process. Don’t forget your containers and reusable bags!

Links and Other Useful Resources

 
The Waste Exchange
The Waste Exchange
This is a website that helps to connect people and businesses who want to divert their waste from landfill, to those who could make better use of it. As the saying goes, "one man's trash is another man's treasure!"
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Community Recycling Network
Community Recycling Network
CRN is an organisation representing Community Enterprises and Businesses focused on Zero Waste with members from all over the country.
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4 My Earth
4 My Earth
4 My Earth makes products that will reduce your waste to landfill. They source and produce eco-friendly alternate solutions for eco-conscious everyday Kiwis. Check out their alternative to Gladwrap!
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Environmental Choice New Zealand
Environmental Choice New Zealand
This site lists products and services that have been accredited with the official New Zealand Environmental Choice label. It provides a credible and independent guide for consumers who want to ensure their purchasing decisions are better for the environment.
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Wanaka Wastebusters
Wanaka Wastebusters
This organsation is well known in the Central Otago Region, and indeed all over NZ for the wonderful work they're doing from recycling to education for sustainability in schools and nationwide projects to minimise waste and promote recycling in Wanaka and across NZ.
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Go Recyle - Free whiteware, ewaste, and appliance recycling
Go Recyle - Free whiteware, ewaste, and appliance recycling
Go Recycle offer FREE recycling of all whiteware, metals (steel, aluminium), home appliances & electronics, computers & e-waste, old Plastics, and vehicle parts to the Auckland area.
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E-waste Recycling
E-waste Recycling
RCN E-cycle is an everyday e-waste solution, with three sites throughout New Zealand. They take a wide range of everyday computer and home electronics.
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Komputer Recycling Deconstruction
Komputer Recycling Deconstruction
This Auckland based company will pick up e-waste for free & has a free drop-off service. They specialise in computer & other e-waste recovery and deconstruction to keep precious e-waste in circulation and out of our landfills.
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EWaste Collections
EWaste Collections
E-Waste Collections have different monthly collection spots through Auckland where you are able to drop off your unwanted electrical goods for free. Check out their collection schedule.
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LoveNZ
LoveNZ
This is a great government led initiative which is focused on promoting recycling practice in public places throughout New Zealand. You might occasionally see bins adorned with "Love NZ" stickers in public venues so that you can recycle while you're out and about!
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ZeroWaste NZ
ZeroWaste NZ
This is an initiative to reduce and ultimately eliminate waste in NZ, by maximising recycling, minimising residual waste, reducing consumption, and ensuring that products are made to be reused, repaired, recycled or composted.
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Rubbish Free NZ
Rubbish Free NZ
This is a fantastic resource for anyone who is keen to reduce the rubbish they send to landfill. The Kiwi couple behind this initiative challenged themselves to live rubbish free for a year and still do! Their site if chock full of interesting tips and hints to become an even tidier Kiwi!
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AskShareGive
AskShareGive
AskShareGive is an online community where people share their time, skills, transport, and old or unused goods. What a noble kiwi initiative!
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FreeCycle.org
FreeCycle.org
By giving freely with no strings attached, members of The Freecycle Network help instill a sense of generosity of spirit as they strengthen local community ties and promote environmental sustainability and reuse. Trade goods, services, skills and transport here for free all over NZ.
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Donate NZ
Donate NZ
If you have something to give, DonateNZ will put you in touch with worthy organisations who are waiting to receive. Save time & money and give your unloved things a new lease on life, whilst helping the environment and supporting your local community.
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Conscious Consumers
Conscious Consumers
This is a great website that lists a number of hospitality businesses and their suppliers in New Zealand who are acting sustainably in all sorts of ways; be that recycling, providing organic, free range, fair trade goods and the like!
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Create Your Own Eden
Create Your Own Eden
Visit this comprehensive website to find out all the information you need about anything to do with composting. From worm farms to compost bins, so you can make your own organic fertiliser.
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ecocentral
ecocentral
Based in Christchurch, ecocentral operates three EcoDrops, operates the Material Recovery Facility and the EcoShop on behalf of Christchurch City Council. They receive and process a high proportion of Canterbury refuse and recycling and seek to divert into usable resources, with a target of minimizing the residual waste to landfill.
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Living off the smell of an oily rag
Living off the smell of an oily rag
This website has tonnes of useful tips and tricks that many people all over NZ have contributed. It has lots of thrifty, crafty hints for reusing and recycling that will save you money! As Grandma used to say, "waste not, want not!"
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Kaipatiki
Kaipatiki
Based on Auckland's North Shore, this trust is very active in sustainable community solutions
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The Great UnpackThe Great Unpack
Why do we really need so much packaging in our life
 
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 Sustainable Living Guide.Sustainable Living Guide.
Tips and ideas on how to live sustainable.
 
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25 Easy Steps Towards Sustainability 25 Easy Steps Towards Sustainability
Here is a really great Ministry for the Environment resource that details some easy steps you can take up to improve sustainability. You will find some great tips in here too for learning how to live waste free!
 
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